PRINCESS BOOK BY JEAN SASSON

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Jean P. Sasson is an American writer whose work mainly centers around The book remained on the New York Times Best Seller list for 13 weeks. In , a lawsuit was brought against the author of the. plz let me know the site where i can read the jean sesson books online. .. Princess, by Jean Sasson is the life story of a Saudi princess as told to an American. Princess: A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia. Princess Sultana's Daughters. Mayada, Daughter of Iraq: One Woman's Survival Under Saddam Hussein.


Princess Book By Jean Sasson

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by New York Times Bestselling author JEAN SASSON This first book in the trilogy describes the life of Princess Sultana, a princess in the royal house of Saudi. Now Jean Sasson and Princess Sultana turn the spotlight on Sultana's two teenage daughters, Maha Enjoy Additional Information From The Book (PDF) and. PRINCESS A True Story of Life Behind the Veil in Saudi Arabia. Princess A New York Times bestseller named as "one of the best books written by women.

Soldiers from various countries sent to the area to fight for the freedom of Kuwait, were presented with free copies of the book, a kindly gesture made by the Kuwaiti government, so that soldiers might know what they were fighting for, which was freedom. Never forgetting what she had seen, over the years she continued her writings and concern about the missing Kuwaitis lost to the Iraqi prison system, despite the many efforts made by Kuwaiti royals as well as ordinary Kuwaiti citizens to gain their freedom.

Her care for the people of the Middle East continued, taking her to unusual stories. In she requested an invitation from Saddam Hussein to visit Iraq. Although she was the author of the book that had greatly displeased Saddam The Rape of Kuwait she received a personal invite from the Iraqi dictator. Traveling to Iraq alone and without protection, she saw for herself the privations being suffered by those most vulnerable: the women and children; deprivations at the hands of Saddam Hussein.

While in Iraq, she was assigned a woman from one of the leading families of Iraq as her translator, Mayada Al-Askari. Her bestselling book, Mayada, Daughter of Iraq was a result of that trip.

Living in Atlanta, Georgia, Jean wrote book after book, until today she is the author of 12 published books. One of the most successful was the Princess Trilogy, a series of books about her friend, Princess Sultana al-Sa'ud, which was named as one of the most important books written in the past eight-hundred years by a woman. The books have sold millions of copies worldwide. Jean's books have won a number of awards.

The Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum Foundation, an organization in Dubai which promotes and recognizes cross-cultural understanding, chose Jean's critically acclaimed book Ester's Child as a book that best promotes world peace. After being gassed and temporarily blinded, the Kurdish heroine made her way out of Iraq into Iran. After Jean was contacted by Omar Bin Laden, the 4th born and well-loved son of his father, she wrote the story of Omar and his mother and their life with Osama Bin Laden, titled: Growing up Bin Laden, a critically acclaimed book.

She later wrote For the Love of a Son, the true story of an Afghan woman who lost her young child to an abusive husband, and spent many long years searching for her son.

Princess by Jean Sasson: Book Review

Jean returned to the topic of the Iraqi invasion and occupation of Kuwait with Yasmeena's Choice: A True Story of war, rape, courage and survival, telling the painful story of a Lebanese visitor to Kuwait who was trapped in the country after the invasion.

The woman was kidnapped and held in a special prison housing innocent women to be brutally raped. Jean wrote and published a small tome, American Chick in Saudi Arabia, telling a few stories about her first two years in Saudi Arabia, in regard to the Saudi women she met.

On a personal note, if I thought the Saudis were a bunch of troglodyte degenerates before, this book only reinforced that impression. I say she was just telling her own story as a royal woman living under those specific rules.

She also states that if change is going to happen, it would be provoked by middle class women, thus declaring that there are differences in society dynamics. View 1 comment. This is truly a fabulous book about the life and family of Princess Sultana.

It has a touch of humour, despite the suffering. Very defiant and is certainly eye opening in a way we could never imagine. This book had the true Arab feel to it. It makes you want to learn more about the Saudi Arabia culture and their royal family. This is the story of Princess Sultana, a Saudi princess, living a life of extreme wealth and yet experiencing poverty within the realm of freedom and equality.

Princess Sul This is truly a fabulous book about the life and family of Princess Sultana. Princess Sultana reveals the darker side of the lives of many women in Saudi. I have to admit there were some parts that's difficult to read. There were some terrifying revelations about young women of barely fourteen being stoned to death, drowned in the house swimming pool with weights tied to them, etc.

The horrifying details of the women's plights and Sultana's rebellion about the situation make for an emotional read. This is such a gripping book and will definitely make you laugh, sad, angry and relieved. A highly recommended read. View all 3 comments. Oct 22, Debarati rated it really liked it Recommends it for: I seriously dont know if the book is fiction or non-fiction. But few months after reading the book I saw an interview of some Arabian princess on a news channel.

The incidents she shared sounded so same to the book. It talks about the kind of life women lead in Saudi Arabia. It discloses some shocking facts like a young girl stoned to death and a girl child was married to a man of 50's.

The life of a princess in Arab is only about gold and dimonds but when it comes to self respect and love, she I seriously dont know if the book is fiction or non-fiction. The life of a princess in Arab is only about gold and dimonds but when it comes to self respect and love, she gets none. Oct 07, Jeanette "Astute Crabbist" rated it liked it Shelves: The reality for most women there is so much worse. She does mention some examples of what happened to other women, but her tone is often self-pitying.

Her life of leisure was a dream compared to the lives of most Saudi women. Here's what filled her days: After a snack of fresh fruits, I would soak in the tub in a leisurely manner. After dressing, I would join Kareem for a late lunch. We would lounge and read after our meal, and then Kareem and I would take a short nap I attended women's parties in the late afternoon We almost always attended a dinner party in the evenings, for we were of a most select group that entertained mixed couples Such a hard life.

And when things were at their worst, you had unlimited financial resources and gullible private plane pilots at your disposal so you could run away undetected, taking your children with you. If life there is so bad, why did you go back after escaping so successfully? I did find the book to be an interesting peek into the lives of the Saudi royals, but I wouldn't read the follow-up books.

Sultana's friend Jean Sasson writes well enough, but she makes a lot of errors in language usage that should have been caught by editors. For example, she uses "restrain" when she means "refrain," and "my duplicity of the pilot" instead of " toward the pilot. View all 5 comments. Jul 18, Cheri added it. As a woman who has traveled to Saudi Arabia and having worn the veil; I have to admit, when I read the stories of these women Jean Sasson writes of, I now feel--looking back on wearing the veil--that I was somehow an imposter I can't explain it any better than that when comparing my life with the lives of these women.

My wearing the veil was only compulsory when I went outside the confines of the base on which I was stationed; to these women it is a way of life. I couldn't help but feel that n As a woman who has traveled to Saudi Arabia and having worn the veil; I have to admit, when I read the stories of these women Jean Sasson writes of, I now feel--looking back on wearing the veil--that I was somehow an imposter I can't explain it any better than that when comparing my life with the lives of these women.

I couldn't help but feel that not only are their faces hidden behind these veils, but so are the lives they live And I thought it ironic that It is the women's urges and desires their husbands, fathers, and brothers wish to control and suppress Apr 19, Sara M. I had a few "that-can't-be-true" moments and I really wished that it wasn't a true story, bc knowing that those acts against women are real and are happening now and are not just history is simply heartbreaking.

I really liked this book although I wished for a better happy ending.

View 2 comments. Oct 17, Lally rated it did not like it. This book was terrible. Terribly written, edited terribly, and I have serious reservations over the authenticity of this book. While I do not question that women are treated very poorly in Saudi Arabia and several other Middle Eastern countries, I have a hard time believing that this 'autobiography by proxy' is true.

When I picked up this book, the quick internet research I did brought up the pettiness between Jean Sasson and her would-be plagiarism victim and I find it hard to respect an author This book was terrible. When I picked up this book, the quick internet research I did brought up the pettiness between Jean Sasson and her would-be plagiarism victim and I find it hard to respect an author that endeavors in internet warfare like a middle-school version of "Gossip Girls".

If this woman, "Sultana", is such a prominent figure in Saudi Arabian royalty, I think it would be relatively easy to figure out her true identity. And there, she'd immediately be put to death, at least according to the book, and guess what? The media would find out about it! Jan 10, Sue rated it it was amazing. This is the real handmaid's tale. First published in , it has been reissued in paperback.

While some of the facts cited about women's lives in Saudi Arabia may have changed since then, most of the story is still, unfortunately, true.

Not an easy book to read, but one that gives voice to a whole group of women you never hear from. Aug 07, A'ishah rated it did not like it Shelves: This book is pure fiction.

I do not say that just because I am a Muslim from Saudi Arabia. I'm saying it because it is true. My three main problems are: For starters, how does someone just "traveling" to Saudi Arabia just happen to befriend a princess and extract the many details of her life in this book?

She's a princess, not a woman on the street, who would still be much mor This book is pure fiction. She's a princess, not a woman on the street, who would still be much more private about intimate details of her life. She conveniently has to rename the princess for "safety. How could these details be so vivid and how could someone within the royal family not know who it was?

She could easily be prosecuted. The language used is archaic and unrealistic. A lot of Westerners are of the opinion that Arabs speak like the characters in the "Arabian Nights.

This book is fiction masquerading as an autobiography. It reads like trash, and the main character is incredibly hard to sympathize with, as she is ungrateful and a spoiled feminist. Apr 13, Irina Garaeva rated it did not like it. A very questionable book. How can it be true and still be published if Saudi is such a strict and even ferocious country? How can this princess and the writer still be alive? There are facts that she mentioned - she can not hide from the Royal family: And all these awful men actions that are described there: Of course it depends on family, but lot of them can A very questionable book.

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Of course it depends on family, but lot of them can develop and even work if they want. And where the remarkable events of Saudi history? They should have influenced the life of the princess for sure! It's a pity that those who have never been here will most likely believe it: And don't read it if you have to go to Saudi - you will be scared for nothing.

Apr 06, Suzannah added it Shelves: Years ago I read Bojidar Marinov's article "Civilisation and Self-Control" , which agreed with, and expanded upon, some things I'd already read on Islamic views of sexuality. It's the kind of article that sums up some startling insights in a very concise way, and as a result I never felt I really understood it. Until I read this book. Princess , by Jean Sasson, purports to be the memoir of an anonymous woman from the Saudi royal family, passionate about changing the oppressed status of women in her Years ago I read Bojidar Marinov's article "Civilisation and Self-Control" , which agreed with, and expanded upon, some things I'd already read on Islamic views of sexuality.

Princess , by Jean Sasson, purports to be the memoir of an anonymous woman from the Saudi royal family, passionate about changing the oppressed status of women in her country. First off, this book is actually terrifying - it nearly gave me nightmares. Once again, while reading the memoir of women in repressive Islamic regimes, I found myself thinking "Who needs dystopian fiction?

By the end of the book, Princess Sultana reflects sadly that there is not a single man in her life whom she is able to trust or respect. I'm profoundly grateful that this is not true of me. Amidst all my sorrow and anger while reading this book, I am more convinced than ever that what the oppressed women of the world truly need is not feminism, but the Gospel.

As Sultana reflects after winning a major battle, "I had found that there is little joy derived from forcing a man to do what is right. It can build schools, but it cannot transform people. It can preach equality, it can try to impose equality, but it can't make a man delight to lay down his life for his wife and daughters. Sultana speaks of the hypocrisy of her country, where young girls can be stoned to death for fornication after having been raped, or where the wealthy enjoy expensive alcohol while upholding a regime that outlaws it.

Feminism simply does not have the power to change individuals, much less cultures. The most it can do is replace one kind of hypocrisy with another, and only when it is in a position of cultural power.

What's needed is someone with the power to retake the world with a mustard seed, with a pebble, with a grain of yeast.

What's needed is someone with the power to kill a man and then make him a whole new creation - and nothing less will do: Sultana is, in a way, right when she says, "this grotesque disease of preeminence lives in the sperm of all men and is passed along, generation to generation. What's needed is Jesus. View all 4 comments. Aug 08, Anum rated it liked it Shelves: Hypocrisy rules the land of the religion that strongly condemned the act the act of hypocrisy centuries ago!

The true story of one of the princesses of the royal house of Al Saud in Saudi Arabia is told in a fashion that is both charming and riveting. The veil that guards the women of the Saudi Arabia also hides behind it years of cruelty and injustice.

It was a very strange experience to read this book. It appears highly prophetic to find out that the very people who call themselves the keepers o Hypocrisy rules the land of the religion that strongly condemned the act the act of hypocrisy centuries ago! It appears highly prophetic to find out that the very people who call themselves the keepers of the faith consider themselves above it. They seem to be guarding their own follies from the eyes of world rather than guarding themselves against the temptations and evils that may lead them astray.

The many atrocities mentioned as to have been committed in the name of faith and Islam has no basis in it at all. For example, the case of the young girl who was punished by death for fornication right after giving birth was a very high act of injustice. I am sure as those teenage boys had no access to such witnesses considering the girl was completely innocent, her death was not a punishment but instead would be deemed as murder.

It is sad to see that the name of the religion which holds the honour of a woman more precious is being used to guard the false honour of the hypocritical men of the Saudi society. Islam remains misconstrued and misinterpreted even among the people who speak the language of its holy book. A prime example of this is the treatment of maids as slaves by some of the families.

Considering slavery was outlawed by the mutual agreement of all nations the laws concerning the slaves no longer apply. However, even if one was to ponder over the matter, countless accounts throughout the lives of the Prophet and early converts shows that kindness and compassion was preached in their treatment instead of cruelty and violence.

Freeing of slaves, whether Muslim or otherwise, was considered a great act of humanity. Moreover, the downloading of a slave and hiring of maid are two very different things. The maid is an employee, a free woman, upon whom the employer has no personal right. The Prophet P. This idea seems to be lost to most of the families depicted.

Forgiveness is admired in the religion of Islam yet its followers seem to stubbornly unforgiving it is a shock that they seem to have even a modicum of understanding of their faith, apart from the harsher to harshest punishments that they can execute on those below them in ranks and power.

The laws that apply to women also apply to men yet only the women seem to be punished and the men forgotten.

Books by Jean Sasson

A land which is the home of the religion of justice breeds so much injustice, it is unfathomable. The education of women was encouraged by the Prophet P.

How will she learn to manage and teach her children without having a firm grounding herself? No one seems to notice this. This book raises a number of questions, including its authenticity, I have to admit. I felt that there is enough truth in the words of the author about the conditions of the Saudi women and society that they cannot be ignored.

The treatment of women in Saudi Arabia breaches all forms of human rights and cross all borders of humanity! Hypocrisy should not rule any land which runs under the banner of the great religion of Islam and sadly that is all it does!!! Porque haveriam as mulheres de ser as castigadas por tal?! Felizmente, no terceiro livro, Sultana parece reencontrar-se. This is the true story of a Saudi Arabian Princess. I am sure that most people can guess some of the horrors discussed in this book.

Unfortunately, this wasn't really anything new to me. I am fairly familiar with Arab culture. I imagine this book would really surprise some. I am not so quick to condemn them all because of the acts of a few. However, it is difficult to This is the true story of a Saudi Arabian Princess. However, it is difficult to justify a religion that generally has created great inequalities, not to mention human rights violations.

Dec 03, Brightness rated it really liked it Shelves: I finished this book and set it aside, wanting to immediately write an incensed rage review at a world where inequalities like this still exist and atrocities are still committed against women in the name of religion. Granted, a lot of what occurs to our Sultana and her relatives and friends can be categorized more as cultural practices instead of religious mandates, but to me countries like Saudi Arabia and others have found a way to fuse those two separate categories into one grossly unfair pr I finished this book and set it aside, wanting to immediately write an incensed rage review at a world where inequalities like this still exist and atrocities are still committed against women in the name of religion.

Granted, a lot of what occurs to our Sultana and her relatives and friends can be categorized more as cultural practices instead of religious mandates, but to me countries like Saudi Arabia and others have found a way to fuse those two separate categories into one grossly unfair practice against the female sex.

Cultural laws upheld by religion. Or religious laws upheld by culture. Either way they've meshed so effortlessly together that sometimes it's difficult to determine when something or someone is being scrutinized through the eyes of religion or through the veins of established culture.

It was also one of the things I found most frustrating about the novel. Sultana is an anomaly. Standing up for her rights. But the apathy of some of her relatives and friends I found most sorrowful. I became so involved, calling people in the area, and wondering what I might do, I decided to return to the region and meet with the Kuwaitis who were pouring out of the country, protecting their families in the only way they knew, to escape over the desert.

And so it came to pass that armed with a letter of introduction from the Kuwaiti Ambassador to Washington, I traveled to London, Cairo, Riyadh and Taif for the purpose of meeting Kuwaitis and others who had left Kuwait. The letter was simple, telling Kuwaitis that I was a writer and would be interviewing whomever was interested in telling the world their personal experiences.

The government letter put no pressure on anyone to speak to me. The decision to speak, or not to speak, was up to the individual. I first traveled to London where I met various Kuwaitis, some from the royal family, hearing their heart-rending tales of worry for their greatly loved country — worry for members of their families who were still in country. From London I flew to Cairo, where I met with desperate Kuwaitis who were rushing back and forth to the Kuwaiti Embassy in that country, all desperately wanting the latest news.

Peter, who was a talented photographer, graciously agreed to take the photographs for the book I was writing. Once again, I met with Kuwaitis who were temporarily living in Riyadh.

The Saudi government and Saudi people had been extremely gracious, welcoming their neighbors with open arms. Many were separated from family members and feared for their safety. From Riyadh I was invited to visit the government of Kuwait who had gathered in the Saudi mountain city of Taif, where all were working to bring peace to a peaceful land, and a peaceful people.

There I met and interviewed the Emir and the Crown Prince, among others in the royal family, and in the government. They were particularly concerned for the well-being of Kuwaitis, because horror stories were coming out of the country detailing events of torture and death. While Kuwaitis were as brave as a people can be, forming an underground force to fight the occupiers, Kuwait has a very small population and could not compete against the huge numbers in the Iraqi military.

I was all for helping the Kuwaitis.

Jean Sasson

It would have been a disaster to allow Saddam to continue to occupy Kuwait, and to make the country a province of Iraq, which was his clearly stated goal. Shockingly, many people wrote fabrications about any one who supported our president in his endeavors to help rid Kuwait of the Iraqi occupying army. Once any lie is told, others repeat it.

I read so many false articles and statements about the book I wrote, and how the book came to be, that I shook my head in wonder that anyone would stoop to such a low level. Which are: The Kuwaiti government did not pay me to write the book. Neither did anyone else. I never provided the manuscript I was writing to anyone other than my publisher. I personally presented the Ambassador with a copy and that was the first time he knew that I had finished the book and it has been published.

Then they would know why we are there. He called my publisher and asked for a meeting. Never did I dream that my comment would create such a plan for all soldiers to have a copy of the book.

They were all very pleased that they had fought to free an entire nation of people. I am adamant that the Kuwaitis I interviewed told me the truth of their experiences. While I am sad and sorry that many has sought to destroy the true stories of the innocent people who suffered and who shared their experiences with the world, I am not sorry that I traveled, interviewed, researched, and wrote the book.

This, regardless of all the lies that have been spread about The Rape of Kuwait. Admittedly, the book is short, and that timing was so brief to write the stories that there was much that was not told.

Khalid and Wafa had been married for nine years and during those years had lived with his parents. Finally, after nine long years, they would have a home of their own.Sasson tells their stories.

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It's great to see the ongoing discussions about women in Saudi Arabia. Similar behavior by Muslim men, however is ignored. Oct 22, Debarati rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Jean used the invaluable material she gathered about Kuwaitis on the day of the Iraqi invasion, to write her bestselling book, The Rape of Kuwait. Oct 17, Lally rated it did not like it. Apr 13, Irina Garaeva rated it did not like it. But this was a Thursday and he only had to work a half day.

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